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The Birth of Bangladesh Through the Eyes of a Prisoner of War: Witness to Surrender by Siddiq Salik pdf 56


- Who is the author and what is his perspective? - Why is the book important and relevant? H2: Summary of the Book - How does the book describe the political and historical background of the 1971 war? - What are the main events and characters that the author narrates? - How does the author portray the role of Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh in the war? H2: Analysis of the Book - What are the strengths and weaknesses of the book? - How does the book compare with other sources and accounts of the war? - What are the biases and limitations of the author's viewpoint? H2: Conclusion - What are the main takeaways and lessons from the book? - How does the book contribute to our understanding of the 1971 war and its aftermath? - What are some questions and topics for further research and discussion? H2: FAQs - Where can I find a PDF version of the book? - Is the book available in other languages? - How accurate and reliable is the book as a source of information? - What are some other books that cover the same topic or period? - How can I contact the author or publisher of the book? # Article with HTML Formatting Witness to Surrender by Siddiq Salik: A Review




The 1971 war between Pakistan and India, which resulted in the creation of Bangladesh, was one of the most significant and tragic events in South Asian history. The war was not only a military conflict, but also a political, social, and cultural struggle that shaped the destiny of millions of people. Witness to Surrender by Siddiq Salik is a firsthand account of this war, written by a Pakistani army officer who was stationed in Dhaka during the crucial year of 1971. Salik was captured by the Indian forces after the fall of Dhaka and remained a prisoner of war until 1973. His book, published in 1977, was one of the first detailed narratives of the war to appear from Pakistan after the separation of its eastern wing. In this article, we will review Witness to Surrender by Siddiq Salik, summarizing its main contents, analyzing its strengths and weaknesses, and evaluating its significance and relevance for today's readers.




Witness To Surrender By Siddiq Salik Pdf 56



Introduction




Witness to Surrender by Siddiq Salik is a memoir of a Pakistani army officer who witnessed and participated in the 1971 war that led to the birth of Bangladesh. The book is divided into three parts: Part One covers the period from March to August 1971, when Salik was a public relations officer in Dhaka; Part Two covers the period from August to December 1971, when Salik was a brigade major in Comilla; and Part Three covers the period from December 1971 to March 1973, when Salik was a prisoner of war in India.


The author, Siddiq Salik, was born in 1935 in Punjab. He joined the Pakistan Army in 1954 and served in various capacities until his retirement in 1988. He was also a journalist, writer, poet, and humorist. He wrote several books on military history, politics, literature, and culture. He died in a plane crash in 1988 along with President Zia-ul-Haq and other senior officials.


The book is important and relevant for several reasons. First, it is one of the few accounts of the 1971 war that provides an insider's perspective from Pakistan's side. Most of the existing literature on the war is either written by Indian or Bangladeshi authors or by foreign observers. Second, it is a candid and honest account that does not shy away from admitting Pakistan's mistakes and failures in dealing with its eastern wing. Third, it is a vivid and engaging account that captures the human drama and tragedy of the war with humor, irony, and empathy.


Summary of the Book




The book begins with a brief overview of the political and historical background of the 1971 war. Salik explains how the partition of India in 1947 created two wings of Pakistan, separated by a thousand miles of Indian territory. He describes how the economic, cultural, and linguistic differences between the two wings led to a sense of alienation and resentment among the Bengalis of East Pakistan. He also traces the rise of the Awami League, led by Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, which demanded greater autonomy and representation for East Pakistan. He recounts how the 1970 general elections, in which the Awami League won a landslide victory in East Pakistan, but was denied power by the military regime of General Yahya Khan, sparked a political crisis that escalated into a civil war.


Part One of the book covers the period from March to August 1971, when Salik was a public relations officer in Dhaka. He narrates how he witnessed the outbreak of violence on March 25, 1971, when the Pakistani army launched a crackdown on the Bengali rebels and civilians. He describes the atrocities committed by both sides, as well as the role of India, which supported and trained the rebels. He also depicts the daily life and challenges of living in a city under siege, where food, water, electricity, and communication were scarce. He portrays the personalities and actions of various political and military leaders, such as Yahya Khan, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, General Tikka Khan, and General Niazi. He also shares his personal experiences and interactions with his colleagues, friends, and enemies.


Part Two of the book covers the period from August to December 1971, when Salik was a brigade major in Comilla. He narrates how he was transferred from Dhaka to Comilla, where he was assigned to the 14th Division under General Rao Farman Ali. He describes the military operations and battles that took place in various sectors of East Pakistan, such as Sylhet, Chittagong, Jessore, Khulna, and Dhaka. He also analyzes the factors that led to Pakistan's defeat in the war, such as poor leadership, lack of coordination, low morale, inadequate equipment, and Indian intervention. He also recounts his personal experiences and anecdotes during this period.


Part Three of the book covers the period from December 1971 to March 1973, when Salik was a prisoner of war in India. He narrates how he was captured by the Indian forces after the fall of Dhaka on December 16, 1971. He describes his journey from Dhaka to Calcutta to Delhi to Jodhpur to Jabalpur to Lucknow to Panagarh to Dehradun to Lahore. He depicts the conditions and treatment of the prisoners of war in various camps and prisons. He also reflects on the implications and consequences of the war for Pakistan and Bangladesh.


Analysis of the Book




The book has several strengths and weaknesses as a source of information and insight on the 1971 war. Some of its strengths are:



  • It is a firsthand account that provides an eyewitness perspective on the events and characters of the war.



  • It is a candid and honest account that does not hide or justify Pakistan's mistakes and failures in dealing with its eastern wing.



  • It is a vivid and engaging account that uses humor, irony, and empathy to convey the human drama and tragedy of the war.



  • It is a balanced and objective account that does not demonize or glorify any side or person involved in the war.



Some of its weaknesses are:



  • It is a subjective account that reflects the author's personal views and biases as a Pakistani army officer.



  • It is an incomplete account that does not cover all aspects and perspectives of the war.



  • It is an outdated account that does not incorporate recent research and evidence on the war.



  • It is an inaccurate account that contains some factual errors and inconsistencies.



The book can be compared with other sources and accounts of the war, such as:



  • The Unfinished Memoirs by Sheikh Mujibur Rahman: This is an autobiography of the founding father of Bangladesh, who led the Awami League and its struggle for autonomy and independence from Pakistan. It covers his life from his childhood until 1966, when he launched his six-point program for greater rights for East Pakistan. It provides an insight into his political vision and ideology.



and its brutal crackdown on the Bengalis, while President Nixon and Henry Kissinger ignored his warnings and sided with Pakistan.


  • The Dead Reckoning by Sarmila Bose: This is a book by an Indian journalist and academic that challenges the conventional narratives of the 1971 war. It questions the claims of genocide and rape by the Pakistani army, and argues that both sides committed atrocities and violations of human rights. It also criticizes India's role in instigating and intervening in the war.



Conclusion




Witness to Surrender by Siddiq Salik is a valuable and unique account of the 1971 war that offers a rare glimpse into the Pakistani perspective on the events and characters that shaped the history of South Asia. The book is a candid and honest account that does not hide or justify Pakistan's mistakes and failures in dealing with its eastern wing. The book is also a vivid and engaging account that uses humor, irony, and empathy to convey the human drama and tragedy of the war. The book is a balanced and objective account that does not demonize or glorify any side or person involved in the war.


The book also has some limitations and drawbacks as a source of information and insight on the 1971 war. The book is a subjective account that reflects the author's personal views and biases as a Pakistani army officer. The book is an incomplete account that does not cover all aspects and perspectives of the war. The book is an outdated account that does not incorporate recent research and evidence on the war. The book is an inaccurate account that contains some factual errors and inconsistencies.


The book contributes to our understanding of the 1971 war and its aftermath by providing an insider's perspective from Pakistan's side, which is often missing or marginalized in the existing literature on the war. The book also raises some important questions and topics for further research and discussion, such as:



  • How did the 1971 war affect the political, social, and cultural dynamics of Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh?



  • How did the 1971 war influence the regional and global balance of power and alignments?



  • How did the 1971 war shape the national identities and aspirations of Pakistanis, Indians, and Bangladeshis?



  • How did the 1971 war impact the human rights and humanitarian situation in South Asia?



  • How did the 1971 war affect the prospects for peace and cooperation in South Asia?



FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about Witness to Surrender by Siddiq Salik:



Where can I find a PDF version of the book?


  • You can find a PDF version of the book at this link: https://archive.org/details/508333740-witness-to-surrender-by-siddiq-salik-english



Is the book available in other languages?


How can I contact the author or publisher of the book?


  • The author, Siddiq Salik, passed away in 1988 in a plane crash along with President Zia-ul-Haq and other senior officials. You can contact the publisher of the book, The University Press Limited (UPL), at this address: 74/B/1, Green Road, RH Home Center, 2nd Floor, Suit# 224-239, Farmgate, Dhaka-1215. You can also call them at (+8802) 44815288 or (+8802) 44815289, or visit their website at http://uplbooks.com/.



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